Reading List

For my project I’m going to try and focus my reading on books about water. This includes reference books as well as fiction. So far I’m curious about reading the following:

1: When the Rivers Run Dry by Fred Pearce (Read!)

In this groundbreaking book, veteran science correspondent Fred Pearce travels to more than thirty countries to examine the current state of crucial water sources. Deftly weaving together the complicated scientific, economic, and historic dimensions of the world water crisis, he provides our most complete portrait yet of this growing danger and its ramifications for us all.

 

2: Martian Time-Slip by Philip K Dick

Mars is a desolate world. Largely forgotten by Earth, the planet remains helpless in the stranglehold of Arnie Kott, who as boss of the plumber’s union has a monopoly over the vital water supply.

 

3: The Water Book by Alok Jha (Read!)

Water is the most every day of substances. It pours from our taps and falls from the sky. We drink it, wash with it, and couldn’t live without it. Yet, on closer examination it is also a very strange substance (it is one of only a very small number of molecules which expand when cooled). Look closer again and water reveals itself as a key to a scientific story on the biggest of canvases.

 

Image result for sphere michael crichton

4: Sphere by Michael Crichton

Within a space ship lying on the sea bottom is a mysterious sphere that promises each of the main characters some personal reward: military might, professional prestige, power, understanding. Trapped underwater with the sphere, the humans confront eerie and increasingly dangerous threats after communication with the alien object has been achieved.

 

Image result for H2O: A Biography of Water

5: H20: A Biography of Water by Philip Ball

The extent to which water remains a scientific mystery is extraordinary, despite its prevalence and central importance on Earth. Whether one considers its role in biology, its place in the physical world (where it refuses to obey the usual rules of liquids) or its deceptively simple structure, there is still no complete answer to the question: what is water?

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